Sheila Simonson's "The Bar Sinister"

BAR SINISTER/THE - Sheila Simonson


As with the other 2 Regency-set books by Sheila Simonson that I have read ("Lady Elizabeth's Comet" and "A Cousinly Connection"), this one also has a great feeling for the period, the way people spoke and dressed and behaved in that time. On the other hand, the characters and the story were lacking in certain respects, and the romance was practically non-existent.  
The story is about a young widow, Emily, who fosters the 2 very young children of the hero Richard Falk, whose Spanish wife has died and who is still working as an officer in the campaign to drive Napoleon from Portugal and Spain. Richard has a great deal of family trouble (certain members of his family are trying to kill him), so he can't leave the children with them.  But of course they find out where he and the children are, so a lot of complications and trouble ensue. In the end it didn't draw me in all that much and I wasn't passionately rooting for any of the good characters. The lack of any romance between the two main characters didn't help (they finally share a kiss on the last page of the book, but that's it, even though the story has gone on for more than 3 years and for almost 400 pages!)


(I originally posted this review in April of 2014 but somehow it disappeared from Booklikes?  I had to retrieve it from Goodreads.)